Review of The Moviegoer

What was it about?

Binx Bolling is an injured Korean War veteran and a stockbroker in New Orleans. When he is not working he is either going out with his most recent secretary or visiting his aunt and his niece Kate, a young woman who struggles with depression. One Mardi Gras, Binx decides to take a trip across America to break out of his everyday routine and to “find himself”. The Moviegoer, Walker Percy’s debut novel, is centered around one man’s quest to find clarity in his life.

What did I think of it?

The Moviegoer is a surprisingly fast-paced novel although hardly anything happens by way of plot. I had to get adjusted to the writing which was Southern-style with a dash of stream-of-consciousness. I don’t recall ever having read another work by a Southern author. On the whole, though, reading The Moviegoer was a pleasant experience. I enjoy introspective novels and this is certainly one. But, I am still not sure about my feelings toward the narrator. Binx is a thirty year old man who has one existential crisis after another. He is so much like Antoine Roquentin from La Nausée by Jean-Paul Sartre, but, I was more drawn to the character of Antoine than I was to Binx. Binx’s thoughts sometimes resembled those of an angsty teenager. I think part of the reason for my ambivalence toward Binx may be the philosophy that underpinned the whole novel. Walker Percy was heavily inspired by the writings of Kierkegaard; in fact, it is through reading Kierkegaard that I learned about Percy. Unfortunately, Percy is not too subtle in this novel. I could list at least four of Kierkegaard’s works that I am certain influenced the characterization and dialogue in the book. The use of Kierkegaard motifs was too heavy-handed for my liking. At one part of the book, Binx even references him as “the great Danish philosopher”. One of the front pages contains a quote from Sickness Unto Death. If you need a lighthearted introduction to Kierkegaard, The Moviegoer could be a good place to start. But if you are are not a fan of explicit philosophical references, this may not be the book for you. While I enjoyed reading the book, there was nothing really memorable about the narrative.

Favorite quote

“What is a repetition? A repetition is the re-enactment of past experience toward the end of isolating the time segment which has lapsed in order that it, the lapsed time, can be savored of itself and without the usual adulteration of events that clog time like peanuts and brittle.”