Do thou, too, remain warm among ice

“It does seem to me, that herein we see the rare virtue of a strong individual vitality, and the rare virtue of thick walls, and the rare virtue of interior spaciousness. Oh, man! admire and model thyself after the whale! Do thou, too, remain warm among ice. Do thou, too, live in this world without being of it. Be cool at the equator; keep thy blood fluid at the Pole. Like the great dome of St. Peter’s, and like the great whale, retain, O man! in all seasons a temperature of thine own.”

Herman Melville, Moby-Dick (Chapter 68)

Review of Gilead

Gileadcover.jpgWhat was it about?

Rev. John Ames is an elderly congregationalist minister in Gilead, Iowa writing to his 7-year-old son about his ancestry and his relationship with Jack Boughton, the troubled son of a close friend. Rev. Ames’ father and grandfather were also ministers and were heavily involved in the abolitionist movement in the region. Throughout the epistolary novel, Rev. Ames’ influences include the reformed theologian Karl Barth and the atheist philosopher Ludwig Feuerbach. He sees God’s hand everywhere but never thinks he’s somehow set apart from the rest of humanity. He recognizes his flaws and his doubts, disagrees with his father’s pro-war beliefs, and wishes he could have had a better relationship with Jack. Gilead by Marilynne Robinson shows how Rev. Ames’ story and life experiences shaped his faith and the sermons he preached on Sunday.

What did I think of it?

I am not the first person to compare Robinson’s prose to Willa Cather’s. The narrative of Gilead is as lyrical and character-driven as Death Comes for the Archbishop. Like Cather’s works, Gilead is not a conventional novel with a beginning, middle, and end. Rather, it is a series of anecdotes about the lives of one or two individuals. Because I prefer character-driven, philosophical works to fast-paced thrillers I really enjoyed Gilead. Rev. Ames has a very holistic view of life; he clearly recognizes how everything is interconnected. Robinson is a self-professed Calvinist, so there are themes from the reformed tradition strewn throughout the work. I was surprised by how ecumenical Rev. Ames was; he attends a Quaker service and appreciates the Methodist presence in Gilead. It is amazing how many sermons Rev. Ames has written throughout his long career as a minister. He has boxes filled with sermons in the attic, but never has the courage to reread his old sermons. After a lifetime of pondering existence and salvation, Rev. Ames is still overwhelmed by the most basic mysteries of life. Gilead certainly deserved the Pulitzer it won in 2005.

Favorite Quotes

“Existence seems to me now the most remarkable thing that could ever be imagined. I’m about to put on imperishability. In an instant, in a twinkling of an eye.”

“It has been my experience that guilt can burst through the smallest breach and cover the landscape, and abide in it in pools and darknesses, just as native as water.”

“I pity [Jack]. I regret absolutely that I cannot speak with him in a way becoming a pastor, knowing as I do what an uneasy spirit he is. That is disgraceful.”

“At that point I began to suspect, as I have from time to time, that grace has a grand laughter in it.”

June and July in Review

Smileys For BlogThis is my first “month in review” post of the year. I really need to get back to doing these at the end of each month.

Books Read in June and July

Yvain ou le Chevalier au Lion (Yvain, the Knight of the Lion) by Chrétien de Troyes – 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

The Once and Future King by T.H. White – 🙂 🙂 🙂 (I will be doing a review of this book soon)

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, and Sir Orfeo by J.R.R. Tolkien – 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Ginger Pye by Eleanor Estes – 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Locomotive by Brian Floca (Illustration samples are below. This is the most fantastic picture book I think I’ve ever read. If you are a train enthusiast or want to prove to your scoffing friend that children’s literature is art, check out/buy this book.)  – 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

 

Reading Plans For August

Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel (I’m currently half way through it)

The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henriquez

The Secret History by Donna Tartt (for a buddy-read with Masanobu @ All the Pretty Books; we’re beginning August 19)

Praise of Folly by Erasmus

I doubt I’ll get through all of these, but this is what I’m hoping to read in the next month or so.